Dying without a will

Dying without a will

Dying without a will is called dying “intestate.” Each state has a different way of handling your property when you die intestate. State intestacy laws distribute property in a uniform way based on blood relation. In most states, if you are married and die intestate, your spouse will get the majority of your property. If you are not married and have children, your property will go to your children or their descendants. If you are not married and have no children, your parents and siblings likely will get your property. And if you have no known relatives at all, and thus no heirs, your property likely will go to the government. To avoid state intestacy laws, you should execute a will meeting all of the requirements under the law of your state.

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